Exercise

Loading Video...
image

Develop The Lower Body, Core And Balance Without Using Machines.

by Mountain Peak Fitness

No Comments

Play Video Hide Video

Here is a demanding exercise that does not require the gym environment to develop lower body strength, core strength and balance.

Over time when you have mastered the movement pattern, progress by grabbing a weighted object in one or both hands and you’ll send those feet, legs and glutes to the “furnace” big time!

Insist on perfect execution of each rep.  In the video, notice how the athlete keeps his non-stance foot right next to the stance foot.  In the beginning you may only be able to do 5 reps on each leg–work your way up to 8-12.  You might also require a long stick, pole or a wall for extra support until you can complete your reps successfully.  Be creative.

Perform this sequence on your “lower body pull” days and prior to endurance training.

 

Click “play video” above.

 

Loading Video...
image

How Is Exercise Making Me Smarter?

by Terrence McCormick

2 Comments

Play Video Hide Video

We all know the benefits of exercise on proper blood flow, waste removal and delivery of essential nutrients such as oxygen and glucose (blood sugar).  But how is it actually making me smarter?

Studies show that exercise not only reduces symptoms of depression and stress, but also is vital to maximize brain functioning by increasing production of neurotransmitters.

Watch this short video to see how a balanced diet and exercise stimulates brain cells needed to be more alert, focused, productive and smart.

Click “play video” above.

 

Loading Video...
image

Functional Fitness Exercises: Jump Rope Basics

by Tim Haft

2 Comments

Play Video Hide Video

Jumping rope is one of the most effective functional fitness exercises.  It’s a cardio event that works your arms, legs, core, strengthens bones, improves your balance and is an ideal brain exercise.

According to research jumping rope for a minimum of five minutes a day can improve physical fitness, and when you build to ten minutes of nonstop jumping at 120 RPMs it can provide the same benefits as the following:

  • 30 minutes of jogging
  • 2 sets of tennis singles
  • 30 minutes of racquet and handball playing
  • 720 yards of swimming
  • 18 holes of golf

In addition, jumping helps to develop the left and right hemispheres of the brain, to further improve spacial awareness and reading skills and increases memory and mental alertness. Jumping on balls of the feet requires the body and mind to make neural muscular adjustments to imbalances created from continuous jumping. As a result jumping improves dynamic balance and coordination, reflexes, bone density and muscular endurance.

Continue Reading

Loading Video...
image

What’s The Toughest Sport?

by Greg Mushen

No Comments

Play Video Hide Video

Skip the elevator, skip the escalator–skip up the stairs instead!

Join champion skyscraper vertical runner P. J. Glassey for this insight into what some call the world’s most intense sport.

And before you freak out “no way, not me,” take it from first hand experience, there are great benefits to even slowly and purposefully walking up stairs at work, home and outdoors.

Start with a commitment that you will walk every stair case  beginning now for the next 30 days to ingrain the habitual behavior pattern.

Then go from there.

Win a trophy in the game of life, one step at a time.

Click “Play Video” above.

 

Loading Video...
image

Plank vs Crunch: What’s Safest & Most Effective?

by Doug Balzarini

No Comments

Play Video Hide Video

The core musculature is designed to resist rotation and flexing of the trunk.  

The plank is a great way to test and train this system.  It’s easy to learn and when done properly it’s safer on the spine than any other type of crunching exercise.

Here are many prone (face down) variations that will allow you to continually challenge yourself.

Click “play video” above for this three minute tutorial.

 

image

Interval Training Affects Men & Women Differently

by Anna Almendrala at The Huffington Post

No Comments

Sprint interval training, or short bursts of maximum effort interspersed with longer periods of active recovery, has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, burn fat and improve endurance performance faster than moderate-pace exercise can.

While the benefits are spread out equally between men and women, men seem to have at least one advantage over women when it comes to this form of training: It creates significantly more muscle protein in men than it does women.

Continue Reading

Loading Video...
image

Easy Progressions: Building Leg And Hip Strength

by Marco Sanchez

No Comments

Play Video Hide Video

Fire up the torso, hips and lower body without elevating the rear leg.

Strengthen all the muscles of the lower body and help ward off foot, ankle and knee injuries.  You get the benefit of the lunge and a split squat without overly stressing the knee joint and hip flexors.

This progression starts with the back knee lifted two inches off the floor while sustaining an isometric hold of 20-30 seconds per leg.  Once you are strong and stabile enough to to perform this move cleanly, you are ready to load it with a dumb bell.

The series includes several more advanced sequences which you might work your way into over time, and concludes with an elevated rear leg split squat jump which is reserved for the most fit and athletic among us.

Click on “play video” for a  2 minute treat.

 

Loading Video...
image

How To Strengthen My Hips

by Mike Boyle Strength Coach

No Comments

Play Video Hide Video

In a Runner’s World article published in 2009 it was noted that if you are looking for the cause of foot, ankle and knee pain you may need to look higher. The research is even more understood and valid today.

Reed Ferber, Ph. D., and Director of the University of Calgary’s Running Injury Clinic, reported on his 2007 study in which 284 patients complained of leg pain.  He found that 93% of them had weak hip muscles.

According to Dr. Ferber:

“Inadequate hip muscle stabilization is the top cause of injury to runners.”

In this video, Mike Boyle, among the foremost strength coaches in the world, shows one way to mobilize, stabilize and strengthen your hips correctly  using a commonly seen movement in gyms everywhere.

 

Loading Video...
image

Sitting Can Ruin A Good Thing

by Flikli

No Comments

Play Video Hide Video

An hour of daily sports can’t compensate for 11 hour sitting sprees.  

For athletes who are dedicated to staying fit, the time spent sitting still is greater than what is healthy for your body.  Where does this leave you?

According to research studies, too much time in a chair is not only ruining our posture and causing a lot of aches and pain, but also raises obesity, diabetes and heart disease risk especially for those who are not physically active.

Step away from the desk, chair and sofa.  Your  life, family and career may depend on it.  

Click on “play video” for ideas.

 

Hard work beats talent when talent does not work hard enough.

EXOS Athletes Performance

Loading Video...
image

Lifting Weights For Explosiveness!

by Jonmusclemass

No Comments

Play Video Hide Video

 Exhale and explode, then slow control on the way back, inhale.  

Resistance training like this ensures at least two important outcomes.  You  build muscle fast.  You pack a big punch.  

Continue Reading

Loading Video...
image

How Women Prevent Osteoporosis

by Lee Memorial Health System

No Comments

Play Video Hide Video

Experts say bone density in women peaks at age 25 and it’s all down hill from there.

Building stronger muscles before you turn 50 can keep bones from becoming fragile, and help you and all women prevent  osteoporosis.

And the the good news is running and playing sports counts!

See this short video from Health Matters and Lee Memorial Health Systems for the facts.